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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a 3 million budget gap. the city handed out 38 pink slips. stockton was the first city to declare bankruptcy and the largest city in the nation to do so. listen up before you do your next load of laundry. ge is recalling front load washing machines because the basket could separate and cause injuries. the model affected were sold in gold, red and white colors from july 2008, to august 2011. heather? >> thank you so much. 24 minutes after the hour now. more and more americans are voting without going to the polls. but the trend is causing concern about voters fraud. eric shawn has more. >> absentee ballots and mailing in your vote are a way for your voice to be heard. 90 million voters in the election 14 million and 50 percent of the electorate used absentee ballots. new jersey expects 40,000 absentee ballots and joe hogan the county clerk said there is a rigorous official that requires officials to insure the integrity of absentee ballots. our people get the information and verification and the ballot is sent out in a complete packet with instructions . that ballot is returned to
's first cities in places like sumer in ancient mesopotamia. but how did farming begin in the new world ? when scotty macneish first came to the tehuacan valley in 1962, he was seeking the answer to one simple question -- did agriculture evolve here or was it introduced from the old world ? then we'll measure out from the corners. keach: in a stratum of the purron cave that had been laid down thousands of years later than those in which he found the hunters and gatherers, macneish made a discovery that exceeded all expectations. macneish: this is a corn cob, and it's a real little one. keach: it may have looked insignificant, but the shriveled ear dated to about 5000 b.c. it was the earliest evidence of farming ever discovered in the new world. since corn is a staple crop, it would have allowed a nomadic hunting/gathering way of life to evolve into a settled agricultural one. corn slowly evolved in the new world from tiny ears, like the one macneish discovered, to the size we know today. like staple crops of the old world, such as wheat and barley, corn has a wonderful property. corn ca
says ambassador stevens was eager to connect with libyans 600 miles away in benghazi, one of the first cities to declare itself free from gadhafi's rule, but it was still a dangerous place. >> i do know there was an al qaeda demonstration in benghazi in june. they had a parade down the street. they raised their flag on one of the county buildings there. >> reporter: isn't that sort of a red flag for the security situation, that you have al qaeda supporters rallying in the streets of benghazi in june of 2012? >> yes, that was another indicator to watch, to be aware of, and to try and compensate for as well. >> reporter: wood says ambassador stevens and his staff repeatedly asked for more security, but instead got less. when stevens visited benghazi on september 11, wood's group and three security teams had all been sent home. so your team pulls out of libya and a month later, you get this terrible news. what had happened in benghazi? >> i had heard about it in the evening that there had been an attack on the compound and i heard there was a fatality. >> reporter: your friend. >> yes. i
that archaeologists call the first cradle of civilization. today the ruins of these once grand cities crumble in the dry desert earth. but how could civilization have emerged in such an arid environment in the first place ? and what might have caused its destruction ? data from mashkan shapir provide clues. stone: we found a very large palace structure, which was decorated with baked clay pieces, showing the city's own god -- nergal, the god of death. zimansky: there was a large temple area, in which we found pieces of sculpture -- lifesize and somewhat smaller -- of animals, human beings, all of which were probably part of the temple furniture. keach: they also found fish hooks, weights to hold down nets and fish spears -- all evidence there was once water here. written tablets like these describe mashkan shapir as a major port. but the city was 20 miles from the tigris river and 30 miles from the euphrates. how could a major inland port or any city, for that matter, survive in the desert so far from water ? stone begins a search for the source of water. for a perspective not possible from t
. it will be in the first week of november before the new york city subway system. 468 station and 68 plus miles of track can reopen. they have been closed since before the storm. jfk airport will possibly open up. we don't know when la guardia or newark airport will open up back for business. airport in boston started slowly the take off and landings. but the tuesday total of cancellation. 18,000 in one day . a lot of folks lost their homes including more than 100 in a fire in breezy point, queens. the damage could top 20 billion and 20 or 30 billion in lost business. those numbers are huge that experts are hoping could be and might be off set by the cost of a repair and rebuilding. back to you in new york. >> thank you, peter. we told you about atlantic city, but just south of there. parts of ocean city, new jersey boardwalk also swept away . sandy swept away much of the town. we are joined where clean up is under way, stephanie. >> it is bad here in ocean city . the bay on one side and ocean on the other. it looks like i am standing on the beach but we are on the fifth street acess point to the boardw
to make their city the first in the nation to impose a tax on sugary drinks. bridge with a ill impo mise . >> noise and air pollution produced by h --the drive through is expected to serve 60 cars per hour during the lunch period. and 20 cars per hour in the evening. we will take a break it is for 38 atm much more ahead we will back in just a couple. >> we're back with some world new secretary hillary clinton may be attentive to douse some of the rhetoric over the libyan attack. the plan says the book stops with her. >> the obama administration has come under increasing criticism september 11th attack. the attack killed ambassador chris stevens and6hiy clinton says when it comes to protecting diplomats overseas she says the book stops with her. >> i am in charge 60,000 + people all over the world 275 post. the president and vice president certainly would not be knowledgeable about specific decisions that are made by security professionals. >> joe biden added fuel to the fire during last week's vice-presidential debate when he said the white house was not aware of increased security at th
, the city first of all they are doing a great job, emergency services. a day in advance, we were able to fit in all the events and functions, but the transportation was a little problem. robert: the owner and operator here at battery garden restaurants. if you are walking around grand central, you may recognize his face from uncle paul's pizza they delivered all the way downtown to our very hungry fox crew. liz: thank you to him. i have been to that wonderful battery gardens restaurant many times. he does a great job, fantastic. thanks to him and all the business owners that who are really putting up the good fight here. speaking of which, you wonder when the markets will start again. will they reopen wednesday? that's the plan right now. you look at the big board and you just see zero, nothing is moving. charlie gasparino was on this story early this morning. >> i think from what i understand it, i'm getting news from exchange officials, there is a 99.9% chance the market ts will be open wednesday. the last thing they want is three days. there's no rule here. we have checked this out. there
and civilization. many of the world's great cities were first established as riverside settlements, and throughout their history these cities have depended on the river for food, a water supply, and an avenue of transport and trade. but like all natural systems, rivers undergo relatively rare but extreme events. river flooding is a threat to nearly every nation on earth. in the united states, floods exact the greatest toll of any geologic hazard, causing billions of dollars in property damage and killing about 100 people every year. and this loss is modest when compared to the destruction in countries with primitive flood control systems, or the devastation in preindustrial societies which were visited by floods without warning. like most natural systems, rivers change and evolve through time in response to a variety of geologic factors that are themselves changing. factors such as regional climate, hill slope, tectonic activity, vegetation, and the bedrock composition of the earth's crust. so the behavior of rivers is controlled by physical laws and geologic processes that can be observed and und
-city tour. first return to venezuela or president hugo chÁvez has won his fourth presidential election, defeating challenger henrique capriles in a race widely seen as chÁvez's strongest challenge since his first victory in 1998. chÁvez 154% of the vote, with henrique capriles gaining just under 45%. tens of thousands celebrated in the streets of the capital caracas after the results were announced. chÁvez held a replica of the sword of independence hero simon boulevard during the victory celebration. at a rally of the presidential chalice, chÁvez reached out to the political opposition and called for unity among venezuelans. >> to those to promote hate, to those to promote social poison, to those or always tried to deny all the good things that happen in venezuela, i invite him to dialogue, to debate, and to work together for venezuela. for the bulgarian people, for the bolivarian venezuelan. that is why i start by sending these greetings to them and extending these two hands and hearts to them, in the name of all of us because we are brothers. >> venezuelan he president hugo chÁ
say the victim died from a traumatic injury this is the city's first homicide in two years. police to conduct was random or if she was targeted. >> 7 cisco board of supervisors will decide this weekend if the mayor ross mirkarimi will be suspended --he is suspended without pay after he come pleaded guilty. he was found guilty of official misconduct. tomorrow be the first time since 1932 that the san francisco board of a visor's have voted on removing an elected official from his conduct. it happened yesterday in the 400 block of broadway around 2:00 in the morning a man was found to have been punched in the face and had hit his head on the pavement when he fell to the ground. he was taken to hospital with injuries. which are potentially life- threatening. the of the person a man in his 20s took off from the area so they have not found him and arrested him. >> a spokesperson for the border patrol says that an agent who was killed last week was killed by friendly fire. this happened at arizona border in mexico. he thought to of his colleagues for armed smugglers and opened fire on th
with. first you can see the citi stock is down. $45 billion would help them in bailout funds. $99 billion line of credit through the federal reserve. now, michael corbat has been in charge of investment that assets, close to $500 billion worth of. currently the ceo. europe, middle east and africa. he was at one point ceo of citi holdings. set up to help divest citi of their assets. back to you. david: adam shapiro, thank you. liz: the stakes are high for the debate. election day three weeks away, can he keep up the momentum he created at the last debate? will president obama score some big marks? the washington bureau chief joining us tells us what we need to be paying close attention to and whether we can expect any surprises. [ male announcer ] how do you help doctors turn billion of bytes of shared inrmation... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? whatever your business challenge, dell has the technologynd services to help you solve it. liz: president obama and governor mitt romney tearing up for the second presidential debate tonight. after obama lackluster performance,
and wednesday from colorado. more debate preview on tuesday's program live from the mile high city. wednesday we have live coverage of the first presidential debate from the university of denver. a special thanks to the city of ingle
is the first city in america to offer the government bank i.d. card regardless of status. what makes the i.d. card unique is the debit card function which allows lower-income people to avoid check cashing fees. the program is expected to take 60 to 90 days to roll out. there will be a one-time fee of $10 for minors and senior citizens. richmond is considering a similar program. >>> in the south bay, the allen rock school district is eliminating 18 teaching positions and will combine classes to reduce spending. these moves will save them more than $1 million. school officials blame shrinking enrollment which reduces funding coming from the states. we will take a look at weather and traffic after the break. >>> welcome back. we have beat the heat. temperatures are the hottest temperatures we had all year. arrived just in time for the first week of october. now it will start to feel more like october. we have a couple of more hot days to get through. temperatures today 95 degrees in livermore. 95 in fairfield. 85 degrees in san jose. look at where we are headed. temperatures just crash as we
to be presenting our first award. we like to invite the newly appointed trustee of city college in san francisco louis santos to the stage. [applause] our latina heritage education award this year goes to the new superintendent of the san francisco school district. ms. carranza. [applause] . ritual carranza was sworn in as the new superintendent of the district on june 27 of this year. richard held a position of director of instruction and social justice at the district since 2009. richard lead the implementation of the strategic plan. his responsibilities include the redesign of the district's central office to support school sites and core curriculum to achieve more equitable educational outcomes for our children. after entering the school system speaking no english he knows how powerful education can be and in advancing our community. please let's give a round of applause to our education award. [applause] >> thank you. if you won't mind staying for a moment so we can present our next award to the next honoree and it's a new category tonight and it goes to a innovative program at missio
hoover first came in, the city council decided to say they were boring to pass along a law banning hoovers because it would disrupt the traditionalists taxi system. it was sort of a clash between old and new, and in the end, the innuendo -- the new ended up winning out. but there are people with a stake in preserving the status quo. we need leaders who are willing to embrace technology and embrace the future in the name of jobs, in the name of a lot of other areas around procurement. >> as the last academic, i think i should say that one of the strongest defenders of the status quo is academia. since we are here at wayne state in an academic institution, i think it would be useful to pick up on the point, to look at how our graduate degree structures intersect with the need of the non-academic labor market. right now, our graduate programs are focused on producing people with ph these for the academic for therket, -- ph.d.'s academic labor market, which is not expanding rapidly, if at all. yet you have companies looking for highly educated people they say they cannot find. academia
meineke. >>> i'm candy crowley in washington. "fareed zakaria gps" will be back shortly. >>> first, we've learned that new york city will suspend bus and train service starting at 7:00 p.m. due to hurricane sandy. we want to go meteorologist bonnie schneider at the cnn weather center in atlanta for an update on the storm. bonnie? >>> candy, the storm is definitely getting closer as it continues to work its way to the north and then make that turn back to the u.s. and that's what's so unusual about this hurricane. of course, having a hurricane in october is unusual, as well. but this is going to be a wind and a rainmaker. we're talking about a widespread area impacted. in fact, millions of people potentially could be without power. when you look at the populations of cities like new york, philadelphia, and as far west as cleveland, ohio. we're also looking at the threat for storm surge, this is very key because winds are going to be strong, and we'll be looking for water to pile up, particularly in the inner harbor areas like into new york harbor, long island sound. all of these are at
.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth, which is tied to the first to, and the revival of our cities with detroit as a case study #one. we're very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great city with incredible potential and we what love to have helped participating in that dialogue to move that process forward faster. what we really want to do is to change the dialogue generally about how the world and country thinks about technology. we really don't think it is understood or appreciated how rapidly the entire landscape is shifting. we know apple is a daunting the next iphone. that's just the most obvious example. things continue to move an astonishing speed and there are developments everywhere you look and we don't think leaders generally get that. i'm going to give you a couple of quick housekeeping things. for one thing, there is app -- it has all of the programs in real time. please use it. everything here is on the record. we want to hear your voice from the audience. have to microphones on either side. you don't have to just ask a question, you can make a comment, bu
everything. first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, four weeks from the day of election. both nominees are getting big betting on ohio. analysts say ohio is a must win for mitt romney. no republican has won the white house without taking the votes out of ohio first, this year, 18. room any campaigned step up the ohio game sending more workers to the state. governor romney will spend four of the next five days stumping there. that is the plan. new presidents show governor romney riding high after last week's strong debate performance. there are still no new polls from ohio since last week but a just-released reuters national poll shows the nominees are in a dead heat. 45 completely erasing the lead of the president. the latest poll from pew shows governor romney with a four-point lead. he was trailing president obama by four points three weeks ago. wendell is at the white house. but, first, john roberts is traveling with the romney camp this afternoon. what is the enthusiasm like for the governor there? >>reporter: well, he is trying to narrow the enthusiasm gap. he won this county, mad
... >> narrator: obama arrived in chicago after the election of the city's first black mayor, harold washington. >> ...have joined hands to form a new democratic coalition... (applause and cheers) >> i think that the fact that chicago had elected an african-american mayor in harold washington sort of emphasized with barack that he was coming to a city where blacks were a major presence and had some significance. >> narrator: washington's politics were a living example of what obama was looking for. >> what washington was able to do was to put together these coalitions-- african-americans, latinos and progressive whites. and he was able to pull that together and beat the machine. >> god bless you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart. >> and that kind of coalition building was incredibly influential for barack. >> narrator: obama's laboratory would be the city's south side. >> we had put an ad in a number of newspapers for a community organizer in the south side of chicago. i'm looking for anybody who might be a good organizer, but i particularly need somebody who's african-american. >>
. when i was a city councilman in lyndhurst, ohio, i introduced the first property-tax rollback in the history of our city. we give tax relief to senior citizens and working families. i worked in a bipartisan fashion -- and we reconstructed the oversight to the workers' compensation investment fund. i worked in a bipartisan way to pass down the budget and try to keep young people in ohio. identified the exports with ohio and worked in a bipartisan way to manage the finances in the state of ohio where we have the highest rating on our bonds and investment and voluntarily cut our budget two years in a row. >> i would emphasize that he voted with his own party -- he voted with them 96% of the time. the only time he doesn't is if the interest group does not have a better offer. he voted against his leadership to satisfy the pay lenders and raised a lot of money. there is nothing in his elektra -- in his electoral records that would show that he ever stands up to his political party on anything significant. >> is there one big area of disagreement you have with mitt romney, mandel? >
. howard first and foremost as a bowdoin upon the city to get beat, was born in maine, went on to the rank of general during the civil war, then became head of the freedman's bureau camus superintendent at west point for some time. was in charge of indian wars in the west for a wild. pundit howard university in washington d.c. as well as lincoln memorial university in tennessee and throughout his life was engaged in those institutions that he is such a large part in forming. i bowdoin commuters and the board of trustees for years and years, served as president at howard and lincoln university at different times in his life was awarded the medal of honor for service in the civil war, really had a distinct whoosh career in lots of different ways. what is pulled here are images of him overtime early on. he's a general by then, but still young. and some older ones, including an interesting woodcut rendition of had reduces hand to simple elements that provides for a grim portrait at the same time. a photograph here of him with chief joseph, who was chief of war and first tribe in the northwest,
. and the first words you need to say in every city and state and just draw a line in the sand, is public schools exist for the benefit of the children. you're going to see a lot of people fall over. because anytime you're spending $199 billion a year, somebody's getting it. and the children get lost in the process. so that's step 1. keep in mind in 1960 when our schools were the envy of the world we were spending $16 billion on them. now we spend more than any other nation in the world, $199 billion a year and ranked at the bottom of the industrialized world in terms of education achievement. one more time, you bought a front row box seat and got a third-rate performance, because the government is not serving you. by and large it should be local. the more local the better. an interesting phenomenon. small towns have good schools, big cities have terrible schools. the best people in a small town will serve on the school board. you get into big cities, it's political patronage, stepping stones. you get the job, you gave your relatives the janitors jobs at $57,000 a year, more than the teachers mak
what became this city, that is to say, the politics that produced it, and the first congress, the politics that sustained the commitment to a potomac capitol rather than a three-state capitol in the 1890s and the experience of the slaves who built washington. and in different ways these books look at the ways in which slavery distorted and corrupted american politics, and more than politics in america. and in america's great debate, particularly the years -- the decades before the civil war. now, what were the origins of this particular book? now, i kept checking the weather today because, as you probably know, storms, thunderstorms were predicted for approximately this time originally. and i was prepared for this, for thunder out there at this moment, which it isn't cooperating. because i was going to evoke the thunderous voice of daniel webster, which i won't intend to try to imitate. i'm not at open -- when i was writing my underground railroad books i came across a speech he gave to a group of businessmen in syracuse, new york, in central new york state, hot bed of underg
what else the judge had to say to brown and why he had to be called back to court in the first place. >> reporter: last summer, kwame brown, a former rising star, resign his chairmanship and left city politics, his career, in ruins. he was ordered back in court tuesday for failing to check in weekly before he was extended in november for felony bank fraud. at his guilty plea last summer, brown had promised to cooperate. but judge richard leon was told tuesday, brown had three times failed to check in as required. brown attempted to apologize. your apology is a little late in the game. what is your excuse, the judge that, cutting off brown. you're five weeks away from sentencing. this is not the way to position yourself. you must be extremely careful. you don't want to know what the next step is. judge leon ordered brown from now on to check in personally at the court once a week. and to adhere to a curfew from 11:00 p.m. at night until 6:30 in the morning. don't be back here until the day of sentencing. this is pretty simple stuff. brown's attorney said his client had gotten the mess
channel 2. >> crowds packed san francisco tonight as first of major weekend events get underway. good evening. >> i'm gasia mikaelian. san francisco is gearing up to host a diverse set of events this weekend expected to attract a million people to the city. for anyone thinking of attending, there's a warning from officials, plan ahead and bring your patience. we have live team coverage. tell us about fleet week events. with begin with matt keller on the crush of people descending on the family. >> reporter: we're here at at&t park. expected to bring traffic to a standstill. >> performed for thousands of people in golden gate park to end the first day of the bluegrass festival. >> it was a huge event. been mellow. >> with events like this all across the city. the traffic will be anything but mellow. expecting a million visitors this weekend for the hardly strictly bluegrass festival. cup races, castro street fair and playoff games. >> if anything else, take public transportation. >> police and transportation officials recommend you do the same. extra bart cars, buses, fer ees and taxi
had helped capture jerusalem in the first crusade. henri's branch of the family came from the red-brick city of albi in the south of france. henri grew up in a world of chateaus and privilege in a family living on the fruits of its noble past. but a france governed by the middle class was losing its taste for nobility. like many aristocrats, his father alphonse retreated into rural pastimes-- riding and hunting. an eccentric, he looked wistfully back to the family's glorious past. alphonse had married his first cousin adele, a common practice in a class anxious to preserve the purity of its bloodlines. but the results of inbreeding for henri were uncommonly cruel. his legs were short and weak. he broke each of them in early adolescence and stopped growing when he was 14. he was just under five feet tall. his head, hands and torso continued to develop. but his stunted legs made walking painful for the rest of his life. denied the aristocratic pleasures of riding and hunting, henri turned to sketching and painting rural scenes. he had a flair for it and in 1882, at the age of 18, he
structure. the city is doing what it must. it's still alarming at first to see so much going away. host: you point out detroit used to have close to 2 million people and now it's got 7er hundred thousand. what happened to the population? guest: the population, well, you know, many people left. they didn't all leave the state. at least a million people moved to the suburbs of detroit, including my parents who were part of that so-called white flight out of detroit. but the truth is that there are riots in detroit in 1943. the population was never that comfortable with the arrival of so many african-americans in the south who came for the good jobs for the jobs when detroit became democracy and started becoming the center of world war ii. even more people that already come, already started the great migration. more and more people came. the white population was never that comfortable with that. segregation is a very real part of the detroit pass. with the riots, it was really almost the final point. host: at 82% african-americans in detroit, it is the most african-american city in the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 103 (some duplicates have been removed)